External Advisory Committee

The strategy, vision and scientific advice for the Institute are provided by an External Advisory Committee (EAC). This council is composed of selected individuals from private agricultural industries; state and federal agencies involved in foreign animal/trans-boundary emerging and zoonotic diseases; biological and pharmaceutical industries; and nationally and internationally recognized senior scientists involved in foreign animal, emerging and/or zoonotic disease research and/or modeling.

Members of the EAC provide important perspectives and scientific advice on key issues and concerns in the private sector, as well as approaches and activities in relevant government agencies. They also offer advice on linkages, potential funding opportunities, and overall direction as well as key scientific advice, programmatic review and evaluation.


Current Members

Alfonso Clavijo, DVM, PhD

Bret Marsh, DVM

Carl Reddy, MB. ChB, FCPHM, M.Sc.

Casey Barton Behravesh, MS, DVM, DrPH, DACVPM

Daniel Donachie, DVM

Gail Golab, PhD, DVM, MANZCVS, DACAW

Gerald Rushin

Gerald Rushin

J.C. Essler

Jamie Jonker, PhD

Joyce Turk

Justin Widener, MBA, PhD

Kathy Simmons, DVM

Leah Wilkinson

Maggie Baldwin, DVM

Patrick Webb, DVM

Ross Wilson

Roxann Motroni, DVM, PhD

Subhash Morzaria, BVSc, MSc, PhD, CIBiol, MRCVS

Alfonso Clavijo, DVM, PhD

Director, National Bio and Agro-Defense Facility (NBAF)

Dr. Alfonso Clavijo serves as the director of the National Bio and Agro-Defense Facility (NBAF), a state-of-the-art U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) research and diagnostic facility designed to protect the nation’s agricultural systems and stakeholders against the threat and potential impact of serious animal diseases.

Prior to his appointment at NBAF, Clavijo served as Laboratory Executive Director of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency’s (CFIA) National Centres for Animal Disease, which operates laboratories in Winnipeg and Lethbridge. As Director, Clavijo oversaw the administration of diagnostic services, related technology development and research to detect and prevent transboundary, emerging and zoonotic animal diseases. Clavijo has held leadership or advisory positions at CFIA laboratories, as well as Kansas State University, Texas A&M University, the Pan American Health Organization, and National University in Bogota, Colombia.

Clavijo earned a doctorate degree in Veterinary Microbiology/Virology while attending the University of Guelph in Ontario, Canada, from June 1990 to March 1995 and a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree from National University in Bogota, Columbia, 1986.

Bret Marsh, DVM

Indiana State Veterinarian, Indiana Board of Animal Health

Dr. Marsh serves as the Indiana State Veterinarian. He is responsible for all statewide animal health programs, as well as providing inspection services for the meat, poultry and dairy products industries. He is also an advisor to the Indiana State Board of Veterinary Medical Examiners.

Dr. Marsh previously served as the Special Detail to the U.S. Secretary of Agriculture’s Homeland Security Staff. In that role, he represented the views of the country’s state veterinarians on issues affecting the nation’s ability to preserve and protect its agricultural assets. Dr. Marsh was Treasurer to the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) for six years, and served in the AVMA House of Delegates for nearly a decade.

Dr. Marsh is a past President of the Indiana Veterinary Medical Association and the United States Animal Health Association. He has received the Distinguished Alumnus Award from both the Purdue College of Veterinary Medicine and the Purdue College of Agriculture. He received his BS degree in Animal Sciences, and his DVM from Purdue University.

Carl Reddy, MB. ChB, FCPHM, M.Sc.

Director, Training Programs in Epidemiology and Public Health Interventions Network (TEPHINET)

Carl Reddy, MB. ChB, FCPHM, M.Sc. (Epi) is the director of Training Programs in Epidemiology and Public Health Interventions Network (TEPHINET) at the Task Force for Global Health. Dr. Reddy provides strategic, technical and operational direction to the TEPHINET network which comprises 73 member FETPs, regional networks and numerous partners and stakeholders across the globe. 

Before joining TEPHINET, Dr. Reddy was the director of the South African Field Epidemiology Training Programme (SAFETP) in Johannesburg and during his tenure the programme transitioned from being dependent upon CDC funding to becoming owned by the National Institute of Communicable Diseases (NICD). During his time with SAFETP, Dr. Reddy served on various subcommittees and was on the board of the African Field Epidemiology Network (AFENET) based in Kampala, Uganda. He also attended program director meetings for TEPHINET, and in 2016, the organization elected him as Chairman of its Advisory Board.  

Dr. Reddy completed his medical degree at the Nelson R Mandela School of Medicine in Durban, South Africa and has extensive clinical experience; as a medical officer in pediatrics, and primary health care including general practice locums in Saskatchewan, Canada. This was followed by stints in Accident and Emergency in South Africa and Southend Hospital in Essex, England. He then pursued the Diploma in Anaesthetics after which he recognized his calling and pursued a four-year residency in public health graduating with the Fellowship of the College of Public Health Medicine (FCPHM). 

In 1998, Dr. Reddy won a scholarship from the Mexican government, which enabled him to study Spanish, do a year of public health-related research and complete his epidemiology training in that country. Armed with his MSc. Epidemiology, he returned to South Africa and joined its Medical Research Council, investigating ways to shorten treatment regimens for tuberculosis through clinical trials sponsored by the World Health Organization (WHO). 

In 2008, he was seconded to the WHO’s Tropical Diseases Research and Training Program in Geneva to oversee the safety of patients enrolled into WHO sponsored clinical trials in Africa. From there he joined the Global Fund and then UNAIDSlater returning to South Africa to direct efforts for the UNAIDS Technical Support Facility in Johannesburg.  

Casey Barton Behravesh, MS, DVM, DrPH, DACVPM

Director of One Health Office, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Captain, United States Public Health Service

Casey Barton Behravesh, MS, DVM, DrPH, DACVPM, is the Director of CDC’s One Health Office in the National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases and a Captain in the United States Public Health Service. She serves as the agency’s lead for implementing a multisectoral, One Health approach to public health that connects human, animal, and environmental health, enabling CDC and partners to address emerging zoonotic and infectious diseases and other shared health threats at the human-animal-environment interface. Dr. Barton Behravesh is experienced in bringing together human, animal, and environmental health officials at the local, state, federal, and global levels to bridge gaps related to emerging zoonotic and infectious diseases. During her extensive career at CDC, Dr. Barton Behravesh has done everything from investigating outbreaks in the field to conducting epidemiologic research related to the prevention and control of zoonotic, foodborne, and vector-borne diseases. She also serves as the head of the Collaborating Centre for Emerging and Re-emerging Zoonotic Diseases for the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE). In her leadership role at CDC, she enjoys mentoring students and new staff to help them reach their career goals.

Dr. Barton Behravesh has a Master of Science degree in Veterinary Parasitology from Texas A&M University. She received her Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree from Texas A&M University College of Veterinary Medicine and a Doctor of Public Health degree from the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Public Health. She also trained as CDC Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) officer. She is a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Preventive Medicine, and has been the recipient of numerous awards, including CDC’s James H. Steele Award for outstanding work on veterinary public health and One Health issues.

Daniel Donachie, DVM

Project Officer for Emergency and Disaster Preparedness, World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE)

Dr. Daniel Donachie is a veterinarian who graduated from the School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Glasgow in the United Kingdom (UK). He spent several years working in mixed animal private practice with mainly a large animal focus before joining the UK’s Animal and Plant Health Agency as a Senior Veterinary Inspector in a field role implementing state veterinary medicine such as welfare inspections, responding to notifiable disease, and border controls.  

He became the Lead Vet for the Exotic Disease Team in Scotland where he had a special interest in contingency planning and worked on a program of simulation exercises from simple drills to assisting with the UK’s large functional simulation exercise  “Exercise Blackthorn”. He has a particular interest in using simulation exercises to foster relationships between different sectors, agencies and organizations. 

He was seconded to the European Commission for the Control of Foot-and-Mouth Disease (EuFMD) based at the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Rome where he coordinated a program of simulation exercises and FMD emergency preparedness scoping missions in the Balkans region. He joined the OIE Preparedness and Resilience Department in April 2019 where he is the OIE Coordinator for the joint OIE-FAO-INTERPOL “Building Resilience Against Agro-Crime and Agro-Terrorism” Project funded by the Weapons Threat Reduction Programme of Global Affairs Canada. This Project aims to foster cooperation between Veterinary Services and Law Enforcement to be able to respond to emergencies arising from agro-crime and agro-terrorism.  Dr Donachie is primarily interested in multi-sectoral approaches to emergencies and integrating innovation and sustainability in biothreat reduction programming.  

Gail Golab, PhD, DVM, MANZCVS, DACAW

Chief Veterinary Officer for Scientific Affairs and Public Policy, American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA)

Dr. Golab has a long history of commitment to ensuring the welfare of animals, starting as an undergraduate student engaged in biomedical research, when she served on a predecessor to today’s institutional animal care and use committees, which protect the welfare of laboratory animals. As a graduate student at Texas A&M University, she co-founded a student chapter of the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals in order to provide education directed at reducing the number of students relinquishing pets at the end of semesters. After graduation from the University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine in 1991, she provided medical and surgical services, and assisted with policy development, for local humane societies. She serves on several scientific advisory committees developing guidelines and standards for the care of animals used for agricultural purposes.

Dr. Golab earned her membership level credential in the Australian College of Veterinary Scientists’ (ACVSc) Animal Welfare Chapter in 2008. Australia is the only country that offers an animal welfare certification for veterinarians.

A longtime AVMA staff member, Dr. Golab worked for several years in private practice before joining the association as a scientific editor for the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association and the American Journal of Veterinary Research. She moved to the AVMA Division of Education and Research as an assistant director in 1998 and became an assistant director in the Communications Division in 2001. She moved to the newly created Animal Welfare Division as associate director in 2006 and was named Animal Welfare Division director in 2007.

Gerald Rushin

Director of the Office of Interagency Coordination, United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) Veterinary Services

J.C. Essler

Executive Vice President, Texas Poultry Federation

J.C. Essler serves as the Executive Vice President for the Texas Poultry Federation advising the board of directors on plans and activities, working on issues within the Texas Legislature and other state agencies, and promoting the Texas Poultry Industry in the state and nationally.

Prior to his role with the Texas Poultry Federation, Essler was a Poultry Program Administrator at the Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory (TVMDL) where he managed and promoted the Texas Pullorum-Typhoid Program and coordinated TVMDL Poultry Programs between College Station, Center, and Gonzales laboratories. He also held a Poultry Epidemiologist   role from 2002 – 2007 managing Pullorum/Typhoid testing in South and West Texas.   

Essler holds a Bachelor of Science in Poultry Science from Texas A&M University.

Jamie Jonker, PhD

Vice President of Scientific and Regulatory Affairs, National Milk Producers Federation

In his current role as Vice President of Sustainability and Scientific Affairs at the National Milk Producers Federation (NMPF), Jamie has general responsibilities in sustainability and scientific affairs, including animal health and welfare, animal biotechnology, dairy farm bio-security, dairy farm air and water quality, dairy farm sustainability, and technical service issues.  He is also involved in coordinating relations with the Federation’s Animal Health & Wellbeing Committee and Environmental Issues Committee

Dr. Jonker is active representing the Federation on numerous national and international committees, including the U.S. Animal Health Association (USAHA), the International Dairy Federation (IDF), the World Animal Health Organization (OIE), and Codex Alimentarius (Codex).  In 2019, he was appointed to the USDA Secretary’s Advisory Committee on Animal Health. He serves on the U.S. Animal Health Association Board of Directors. In 2020, hwas elected as Chair of the IDF Science Program Coordinating Committee and serves on the IDF Board of Directors. Dr. Jonker has also served on the IDF Delegations to the Codex Committee on Residues of Veterinary Drugs, the Codex Ad Hoc Intergovernmental Task Force on Animal Feeding, and the Codex Ad Hoc Intergovernmental Task Force on Antimicrobial Resistance. 

In 2021, he was appointed as an ex officio member to the USDA APHIS Veterinary Services’ National Animal Disease Preparedness and Response Program (NADPRP) Consultation BoardJamie received his B.S. degree and M.S. degree from Cornell University, and his Ph.D. from the University of Maryland.  Prior to joining NMPF, his career included 6 years of experience in agricultural policy including service at the National Academy of Sciences, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Agriculture.  

Joyce Turk

Independent Consultant and Retired Senior Livestock Advisor, United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Bureau of Food Security

Ms. Turk’s career spanned thirty-six years as Foreign Service Officer and Civil Service employee for U.S.A.I.D. with focused experience in agricultural and livestock program management after serving as a livestock advisor in the U.S. Peace Corps-Philippine Islands. Her responsibilities have included managing a multimillion dollar portfolio of livestock projects and the implementation of research activities and teams, analyzing the feasibility of technical proposals and negotiating terms of reference, evaluating international research programs, coordinating strategic portfolio planning, and organizing and chairing international and domestic symposia on global livestock production and trade.

Ms. Turk is an invited speaker at annual meetings of the American Association of Bovine Practitioners, American Veterinary Medical Association, and the American Society for Animal Science as well as to university classes. She has published numerous papers for USAID reporting as well as for public access through Elsevier, CAB International, UN-FAO and in proceedings of meetings. International consultancies have included: The Wellcome Trust, United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization, the International Fund for Agricultural Development, World Organization for Animal Health, European Union, International Atomic Energy Agency, and USAID livestock programs in Armenia, Bolivia, Bulgaria, Caribbean Islands (Antigua, Barbados, Jamaica, Martinique, St. Lucia, Trinidad, and Tobago), Costa Rica, East Timor, Ecuador, Ethiopia, Indonesia, Israel, Kenya, Mali, Mexico, Morocco, Nepal, Niger, Peru, Republic of Georgia, Republic of Macedonia, Rwanda, Senegal, Sri Lanka, Tajikistan, Tanzania, Uganda, the West Bank, and Zimbabwe.

She is a multi-year recipient of USAID’s Meritorious Performance Awards and is listed in Who’s Who of American Women. Ms. Turk currently serves as an External Advisory Board member for the University of Florida’s Livestock Systems Innovation Lab (LSIL), the Institute of Infectious Animal Diseases (IIAD)at Texas A&M, and for Ohio State’s Global One Health initiative (GOHi).

Justin Widener, MBA, PhD

Industry Representative, Health for Animals

Justin Widener is a Research and Development Leader at Boehringer Ingelheim., an animal health company with global R&D and manufacturing facilities in Georgia, and with their North American business operations based in Duluth, Georgia.  Justin has been working and studying in the field of biotechnology since 1999.   

After receiving his BA from Hamilton College in New York, Justin conducted research at Argose, Inc., a medical device start-up company developing innovative blood glucose meters.  Following a short break to walk the Pacific Crest Trail, Justin returned to school and earned his PhD in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology from Brown University in Rhode Island.  Justin conducted a post-doc at the University of Georgia where he focused on the biochemistry of host – parasite interactions. Justin moved back to industry at Merial (now part of Boehringer Ingelheim) as a Project Manager, during which time he earned his Project Management Professional accreditation and Six Sigma Green Belt, before advancing into the role of a Global Research and Development Leader.  In 2014 Justin received his Master’s degree in Business Administration and is currently leading several vaccine projects across multiple production animal species and against multiple disease targets.  Justin resides in Athens, Georgia. 

Kathy Simmons, DVM

Chief Veterinarian, National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA)

Dr. Kathy Simmons is the Chief Veterinarian for the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA), working out of the Center for Public Policy in Washington, DC. Dr. Simmons provides leadership and guidance on matters pertaining to animal health and welfare, working predominantly with the regulatory agencies involved in animal health issues and food safety. She represents the beef industry in dealing with international animal health at the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE)and with international food safety issues at Codex Alimentarius.

Additionally, Dr. Simmons serves as policy advisor to NCBA’s Cattle Health and Well Being Committee and working groups. Dr. Simmons received her doctorate in veterinary medicine from the Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine in Blacksburg, Virginia. Dr. Simmons worked in private veterinary practice for over 25 years in Virginia and West Virginia. From 2010-2011, she served in the United States Senate as a Congressional fellow, working on human health policy in the office of Senator Olympia Snowe (R-ME). Dr. Simmons has been in her current position as Chief Veterinarian at NCBA since 2012.

Leah Wilkinson

Vice President of Legislative, Regulatory, and State Affairs, American Feed Industry Association (AFIA)

Leah Wilkinson is the American Feed Industry Association’s vice president of public policy and education. Wilkinson joined AFIA in 2010. She interacts with state legislatures, feed regulatory agencies in the western U.S., the Association of American Feed Control Officials and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Wilkinson also works with the AFIA Feed Regulatory and Ingredient Approval and Definition Committees and serves as the chair of the International Feed Industry Federation’s Regulatory Committee.

Growing up on a Minnesota swine farm, and as a graduate in swine production from the University of Minnesota, Wilkinson is very familiar with animal agriculture. She has also worked for the National Pork Producers Council and the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, both in Washington, D.C. Before joining AFIA, Wilkinson served as the director of policy and industry relations for ViaGen, Inc. in Austin, Texas. Wilkinson holds a bachelor’s degree in animal and plant systems from the University of Minnesota. She can be reached at (703) 558-3560.

Founded in 1909, AFIA, based in Arlington, Va., is the world’s largest organization devoted exclusively to representing the business, legislative and regulatory interests of the U.S. animal food industry and its suppliers. The organization’s membership is comprised of more than 680 domestic and international companies that represent the total feed industry — manufacturers of commercial and integrated feed and pet food, ingredient suppliers, pharmaceutical companies, industry support and equipment manufacturers. AFIA members manufacture more than 75 percent of the feed and 70 percent of the non-grain ingredients used in the country. AFIA is also recognized as the leader on international industry developments and holds membership in the International Feed Industry Federation.

Maggie Baldwin, DVM

State Veterinarian, Colorado Department of Agriculture

Dr. Maggie Baldwin, state veterinarian of  The Colorado Department of Agriculture (CDA), manages CDA’s Animal Health division through planning, directing and executing all programs, policies and cooperative agreements with other governmental agencies.

Dr. Baldwin focuses her efforts on the implementation of secure food supply plans and emergency response plans, enhanced animal disease traceability, education, and robust stakeholder engagement. In addition to animal disease control, Dr. Baldwin has assumed a key emergency management role for CDA and the state in last year, having been closely involved with all hazards incidents, including many significant wildfires and the state COVID-19 response.  She was named 2020 Veterinarian of the Year by the Colorado Veterinary Medical Association in recognition of her tireless effort, unparalleled enthusiasm, and outstanding service to the veterinary profession and the entire state of Colorado throughout a difficult year in her role as the Assistant State Veterinarian.

Dr. Baldwin earned her DVM from the University of Minnesota’s College of Veterinary Medicine in St. Paul and began her career in public service as a Supervisory Public Health Veterinarian with USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service and also served as a Veterinary Medical Officer with USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

Patrick Webb, DVM

Director of Swine Health Programs, National Pork Board

Dr. Patrick Webb is the director of swine health programs at the National Pork Board, where he joined in 2005.  He is responsible for the Pork Checkoff efforts in animal identification, pre-harvest traceability and foreign and emerging animal disease planning, preparedness and response.  Dr. Webb received both his DVM and BS in animal science degrees from Iowa State University.  

Ross Wilson

President and CEO, Texas Cattle Feeders Association (TCFA)

Ross Wilson serves as the President and CEO of the Texas Cattle Feeders Association (TCFA). Wilson joined TCFA in 1985 as government affairs director and in 1998 was named vice president. During Wilson’s career at TCFA, he has been the association’s point person on state and national legislative and regulatory issues for cattle feeders.

 

Roxann Motroni, DVM, PhD

National Program Leader for Animal Production and Protection, Agricultural Research Service

Subhash Morzaria, BVSc, MSc, PhD, CIBiol, MRCVS

Retired Veterinarian, Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations

Dr. Subhash Morzaria is a veterinarian with an MSc and a PhD in Medical Parasitology from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, UK. Subhash has acquired over 35 years of international experience in technical and management capacity on animal health and livestock development. He has worked for several national and international organisations in Africa, UK and Asia and has held senior research and managerial positions in various institutions that include the International Laboratory for Research on Animal Diseases (ILRAD) and International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) of the Consultative Group on Agriculture (CGIAR), and the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations.

In Africa and the UK, he has contributed significantly in addressing a range of animal disease problems focusing on the improvement and commercialisation novel vaccines and diagnostics against a range of vector-borne pathogens. For the last 11 years Subhash has been working for the FAO’s Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific, Bangkok in various capacities including coordinating FAO’s Emergency Centre for Transboundary Animal Diseases (ECTAD) programme on high impact zoonotic and non-zoonotic infectious diseases.

He has contributed significantly towards the development of regional and international strategies for prevention and control of avian influenza and other priority transboundary animal diseases (TADs). More recently he has been involved in the development and promotion of One Health concepts, including coordinating and writing the interagency (FAO, WHO, UNICEF, UNSIC, OIE and WB) document: Contributing to One World One Health: Strategic Framework for Reducing Risks of Infectious Diseases at the Animal-Human-Ecosystems Interface. Subhash has authored over 200 scientific papers in international refereed journals and has supervised a number of PhD students in the Africa, UK and Asia. He is also Adjunct Professor at University of Murdoch, Perth, Australia.

*Note: Drs. Barton Behravesh, Alfonso Clavijo, and Roxann Motroni are serving in their personal capacity


Ex Officio Members

Amy K. Swinford, DVM, MS, DACVM

Dan Hale, PhD

Jay Treat, MS, PhD

Kurt Zuelke, DVM, PhD

Linda Logan, DVM, PhD

Michael Criscitiello

Amy K. Swinford, DVM, MS, DACVM

Interim Director, Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory (TVMDL)

Prior to her promotion to interim director in June 2021, Dr. Swinford served as associate director since February 2015 for Texas A&M’s Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory (TVMDL) and was the microbiology branch chief and Bacteriology Section head at the College Station laboratory.

During her time as the associate director, Dr. Swinford assisted the director in the executive operation of the agency, which includes overseeing the efforts of the resident directors at the Canyon, Center, and Gonzales laboratories. Dr. Swinford represents the agency with relevant professional societies, and interacts with industry, government, and community officials. In addition, she provides leadership to improve and streamline agency operations while ensuring diagnostic results are timely, affordable and relevant to all TVMDL clients.

Dr. Swinford earned multiple degrees from the University of Illinois: two bachelor’s degrees, a master’s degree in veterinary pathobiology and a doctorate in veterinary medicine. She became a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Microbiologists in 1997, and in 2012 was elected to the organization’s board of governors. She began her veterinary career in Nebraska, where she worked at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln’s Veterinary Diagnostic Center, held positions with two veterinary biopharmaceutical companies, and served in the United States Air Force Reserve as a public health officer. In 2005, Dr. Swinford was hired as the Bacteriology section head at TVMDL in College Station. She was promoted to branch chief in 2012, a position in which she oversaw the Bacteriology, Molecular Diagnostics, Serology and Virology sections.

Dan Hale, PhD

Associate Director, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service

Dan Hale is a professor and Extension meat specialist and a member of the meat science section in the Department of Animal Science. He received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Kansas State University and a doctorate in food, nutrition and institutional sciences from Oklahoma State University.

Hale interprets and extends information on diet/health, food safety, livestock growth and meat science to consumers, youth, health professionals, retailers, food service managers, packers, processors and livestock producers. He also performs industry applied meat science research, and he is a member of the faculty of food science and technology. Hale has worked with the National Consumer Retail Beef Study, the National Market Basket Survey and the Beef Tenderness Survey, which examined supplies of beef offered at the retail meat case and determined what consumers want in meat products. He also contributes information to many national consumer magazines. Hale is a member of the Texas FoodSafe team, an interdisciplinary group of Extension specialists who examine human food safety issues and agricultural practices. He also works in the area of beef quality assurance, coordinating a web-cd interactive training program.

Hale recently completed a term as a director for the American Meat Science Association, and served as chair of the Reciprocal Meats Conference in 2003.

Jay Treat, MS, PhD

Chief Manufacturing Officer and Principal Investigator, Center for Innovation in Advanced Development & Manufacturing

Dr. Treat is a well-recognized technical and bioprocessing leader with 28+ years of broad industrial experience and demonstrated accomplishments in biologics (recombinant proteins, monoclonal antibodies, viral vaccines and algae), diagnostics and vaccine manufacturing process development, scale-up, characterization, technology transfer, manufacturing, quality assurance and regulatory support. He has been providing scientific excellence and strategic leadership within multifunctional CMC teams on over 250+ large molecules, peptides, MSCs, small molecules and vaccines plus >1,500 diagnostics including IVF. His experience in quality systems and regulatory include 65+ INDs, 2 IDEs, +1,500 510Ks and numerous FDA, EMA, and ISO inspections. Manufacturing experience extends from bench scale bioreactors to 30,000L biologics to +120,000L for algae.

Prior to joining Texas A&M University as Director of the National Center for Therapeutics Manufacturing working closely with BARDA and the CIADM teams, he served as President and Chief Technology Officer at Bone Biologics Corporation, Chief Operating Officer at Avid Bioservices CDMO where he oversaw biologic manufacturing from conception to commercial licensing of the facility, VP of R&D at Irvine Scientific for cell culture media and IVG to various leadership positions including process development, manufacturing and Quality Systems at BioWhittaker and later Cambrex involving cell culture media, LAL, instrumentation, small molecule chemical synthesis, and marketing.

Dr. Treat received his Bachelor of Science of Microbiology in 1979, his Master of Science of Microbiology in 1982, and his Doctor of Philosophy of Agricultural and Biochemical Engineering in 1988 from Texas A&M University in College Station, Texas.  Dr. Treat is also a graduate of the Center for Creative Leadership in partnership with Cambrex in 1998 and the Executive Development MBA Program through Columbia University at Ardan Hill in 1998.  Dr. Treat was a member of the Texas A&M University Chemical Engineering Scientific Advisory Board from 2000-2014.  He was also a previous member of Emergent BioSolutions and XOMA, LLC External Advisory Boards.

Kurt Zuelke, DVM, PhD

Director, Global Health Research Complex (GHRC)

Dr. Zuelke is an accomplished research scientistveterinarian and Director of multiple large scale maximum bio-containment infectious disease research facilities in the wider U.S. and Australian global health sectors.  

Dr. Zuelke is the inaugural Executive Director of the Texas A&M University Global Health Research Complex (GHRC). The GHRC is a newly constructed $86 million, state-of-the-art, nationally distinct biocontainment (BSL-2, BSL-3 and BSL-3Ag) large animal holding and research laboratory facility designed to combat existing and emerging diseases that pose the gravest threat to Texas public health and to its $100 billion agricultural economy. The GHRC supports and advances multi-disciplinary large animal and insect vector research, global health education, and training opportunities for faculty at Texas A&M and their partners from other academic institutions and industry from around the world.  

Dr. Zuelke previously (2013 – 2017) served as the Director of the Australian Centre for Disease Preparedness (ACDP) in Geelong.  ACDP protects Australia’s $20B livestock and animal products export industries by delivering diagnostic services, global surveillance, and outbreak response support against emergency animal diseases, and is one of few global facilities routinely performing BSL-4 level research and diagnostics in large animal species. As an OIE International Collaborating Center, ACDP is a leader in implementing One Health partnerships to manage emerging zoonotic infectious disease risks across SE Asia 

Dr. Zuelke previously (2006 – 2012) served as the Director of the USDA ARS National Animal Disease Center (NADC) in Ames IA, where he led NADC’s strategic business reorganization and relocation into new $470M facilities supporting BSL‐2, BSL‐3, and BSL‐3Ag level research in livestock and wildlife species. He also co‐founded the USDA National Centers for Animal Health with the Directors of the USDA APHIS National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL), and USDA APHIS Center for Veterinary Biologics (CVB) to provide joint governance and support services for NADC, NVSL, and CVB.  Prior to joining NADC, Dr. Zuelke served as a USDA representative to the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy where he coordinated and led OSTP’s portfolio of interagency biotechnology, agricultural and life science programs, and led the U.S. Delegation to the OECD Working Party on Biotechnology. 

In 2018, Dr. Zuelke founded an independent consultancy that delivers executive level strategic biosecurity, biocontainment facility management, and One Health solutions to a global clientele.  Notable clients included Merrick’s OPTIC team supporting development of the business models and strategic operational plans for the Department of Homeland Security/USDA National Bio and Agro-Defense Facility (NBAF) in Manhattan KS and Texas A&M University.   

Dr. Zuelke received a B.S. in Animal Science from the University of Wisconsin-River Falls, DVM from the University of Minnesota, and a Ph.D. in Physiology from the University of Georgia.  He has maintained career-long research and science policy interests in agriculture, comparative medicine, genomics, biotechnology, global health and biosecurity, biocontainment engineering and the ecology of emerging infectious zoonotic diseases. 

Linda Logan, DVM, PhD

Director of International Programs, Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences (CVMBS)

Dr. Linda L. Logan is Texas A&M University (TAMU) Professor in Veterinary Pathobiology and the Director for International Programs for College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences (CVM)Dr. Logan as Director for the CVM International Program, is involved in development of new research programs and capacity development activities for Africa the Middle East and Asia funded by Texas A&M University, US Department of Agriculture, US Agency for International Development, Food and Agriculture Organization, Centers for Disease Control and the Defense Threat Reduction Agency. She also provides leadership and coordination for the CVM study abroad programs. During her tenure the CVM faculty has created a dozen new study abroad programs that provides students opportunities to join faculty lead study abroad credit bearing courses in Europe, Central America, Asia and Africa. 

Dr. Logan spent a number of years as a scientist researching livestock vector-borne and transboundary diseases in both West and East Africa and at the Plum Island Animal Disease Center, New York. Dr. Logan lived and worked for more than 20 years in Africa, the Middle East and Central Asia. She was engaged in animal and public health research and livestock development projects in Mali, Kenya, Ethiopia, Egypt, Nigeria, Senegal, Burkina Faso, Niger and South AfricaShe served the United States Department of Agriculture as the Agricultural Research Service National Program Leader for Animal Health which set animal disease research priorities for the 11 USDA laboratories where animal disease research is conducted. She later selected as the Animal Plant Health Inspection Services Senior Attaché overseeing animal and plant health activities in Africa and the Middle EastMuch of her international work between 2004-10 was focused on response activities to highly pathogenic avian influenza outbreaks in the Middle East and Africa. 

For a couple of years Dr. Logan led the Texas Animal Health Commission (TAHC) as its Executive Director. The TAHC provides the regulatory livestock disease surveillance and control programs and emergency response support for disease outbreaks or animals in disaster responses for the state of Texas. In one of her leadership roles at TAMUDr. Logan served as Department Head for Veterinary Pathobiology at the CVM for four years. Dr. Logan lectures on emerging infectious diseases and transboundary livestock diseases and veterinary pubic health topics in several courses offered to undergraduate and veterinary students.  She spends several hours each week mentoring undergraduate, veterinary and graduate students who wish to identify opportunities for international engagement. 

Dr. Logan was awarded the American Veterinary Medical Associate 12th International Congress Prize for her international contributions to the veterinary profession. In 2016, the School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, recognized Logan with an outstanding Alumni Achievement Award. Each May-June, for the past 7 years, Dr. Logan, with two faculty colleagues, takes groups of TAMU students to South Africa for a unique study abroad experience focused on wildlife conservation and medicine. A variety of TAMU teaching and capacity development activities allow Dr. Logan to continue to engage in rewarding TAMU collaborative projects in Africa the Middle East and Asia. 

Michael Criscitiello

Associate Dean for Research & Graduate Studies, Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences (CVMBS)

Dr. Criscitiello is the Associate Dean for Research & Graduate Studies and a Professor in the Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, and holds the John Tom Campbell ’45 Research Chair. A native of coastal North Carolina, he received degrees from UNC-Chapel Hill, East Carolina University and the University of Miami, and was a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Maryland School of Medicine at Baltimore. 

Dr. Criscitiello’s research merges immunology, genetics and evolution. A focus is the early natural history of the vertebrate adaptive immune system, with particular attention to lymphocyte antigen receptor genes (e.g., antibodies and T cell receptors), and genetic diversification mechanisms for receptor repertoires. NIH, USDA and NSF grants have funded this work in shark, frog, shrimp, tuna and cattle. 

Dr. Criscitiello teaches a unique graduate course in immunogenetics and comparative immunology, undergraduate immunology and contributes lectures to courses in microbiology, immunology, genetics, cell and molecular biology, and aquaculture diseases. He is passionate for training graduate students in collaborative research, and has served on >70 MS and PhD committees. He enjoys traveling with his wife and three daughters, sports, maps, gardening, live music, jogging, and bike commuting.